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“What Would You Do” is written by JOSP’s Mike Kindlick, where each month he explores various situations, offering insight to solutions, condolences and empathy for some of the DJ/Entertainment Industry’s most pondering scenarios.

I hope everyone is safe. Most of us find ourselves with time on our hands, and it was in fact this “time” that reminded me of a wedding couple from a few years back and got me thinking if I would handle this situation differently today. So, this month, I literally am asking myself, “What Would You Do”?

Several years ago our company had a potential groom that was adamant about what music needed to be played, how it was played and when it was played. As professionals, we often pride ourselves on being programmers as well as MCs and entertainers. Playing the right music is great, but how and when you program the music mix is also of key importance to the flow and experience of your events.

Several years ago our company had a potential groom that was very adamant about what music needed to be played.

This particular groom listed the exact songs, order and time of music, essentially making us a push play, human jukebox. This took away what we as professional DJs do best — know our music, crowd and create an atmosphere. I know we always say, “Do what the customer wants” and make it all about them, but we also feel the need to convey to our customers to trust us in the process.


We felt we were not right for what this groom demanded and we let them walk away. That was not during a time like this! Would we make the same decision, during difficult economic times? Would we take the job for the sake of the job or stick to our professional standards of knowing we are good at what we do and convey that professional standard to the client!

As I’m writing this, I’m still not 100% certain what the result would be, but I know that I wouldn’t change our approach and belief in our professional principles. So, my tips for this month’s discussion:

Playing the right music is great, but how and when you program the music mix is also of key importance to the flow and experience of your events.

Tip #1:
Know your worth and stick to the principles of what you believe. Will your mindset change during the particular time you are going though, sure, but changing your professional guidelines should not.

Tip #2
It is ok to say no. Not every customer is going to be your customer, but always make sure you are saying no for the right reasons. Don’t turn away a customer for something you believe you can work with.

Just something I was recently thinking about and if and what I might do differently during our current time. This is my take on a situation, and where it may seem like a simple solution to one, someone else might not think the same.

Only one person can make the decision for you, so just ask yourself, “What Would You Do?”

DJ Times Magazine is copyright © 2020 by DJ Publishing, Inc. www.djtimes.com

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